Boat Plans & Kits

If you are a designer who offers plans, or kit boats, we invite you to enter your information in the Directory of Boat Plans & Kits. There is no charge! This is for boats of ANY hull material. And if you’re in the market for a boat to build, this is a fine place to start.

 

833 results for All Boat Plans & Kits

22' Fox Island Class

Designer: 
Joel White
Skill Level to Build: 
Intermediate

This double-ended sloop combines genuine tradition and modern performance.

Construction: Glued-lapstrake plywood over laminated frames.

Lofting is required.

Plans include 4 sheets.

SCHEGGIA

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani
Skill Level to Build: 
beginner

SCHEGGIA (designed to compete in 10 Foot Class – www.diecipiedi.it) is narrow at waterline which makes it fast. Thanks to its flare sides stability increases considerably when the boat starts to hee

West River 18

Designer: 
John C. Harris
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner/Intermediate

The West River 18™ has built a huge following thanks to its speed, comfortable cockpit, and lithe good looks.

Annapolis Wherry

Designer: 
Chesapeake Light Craft
Skill Level to Build: 
Intermediate

The Annapolis Wherry offers thoroughbred performance on the water combined with breathtaking grace. The Annapolis Wherry has been turning heads since 1997.

Chesapeake LT 16

Designer: 
Chesapeake Light Craft
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner/Intermediate

The Chesapeake touring kayaks are icons in the sea kayaking world. Built in the thousands in dozens of countries around the world, the Chesapeakes are solid-tracking, comfortable kayaks.

Northeaster Dory

Designer: 
John C. Harris
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner/Intermediate

The Northeaster Dory is small enough to be rowed singly, but big enough for tandem rowing with two adults. Even four adults have comfortable seating. Performance rowers may add a sliding seat.

Daysailer 30'

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani and Matteo Costa
Skill Level to Build: 
expert

If we have to base ourselves on market demand before 2008, the two daysailers that we propose are very small. At that time, generally characterized by a continuous increase in boat size, it seemed as though a daysailer could not be less than 12 m...