Boat Plans & Kits

If you are a designer who offers plans, or kit boats, we invite you to enter your information in the Directory of Boat Plans & Kits. There is no charge! This is for boats of ANY hull material. And if you’re in the market for a boat to build, this is a fine place to start.

 

859 results for All Boat Plans & Kits

New York 32

Designer: 
Sparkman & Stephens

Design No. 125, the NY 32s have stood the test of time with two-thirds of the original fleet still sailing and remains competitive.

SCHEGGIA

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani
Skill Level to Build: 
beginner

SCHEGGIA (designed to compete in 10 Foot Class – www.diecipiedi.it) is narrow at waterline which makes it fast. Thanks to its flare sides stability increases considerably when the boat starts to hee

Newport Runabout

Designer: 
Nelson Zimmer
Skill Level to Build: 
Advanced

This runabout reveals the influence of Zimmer’s association with John Hacker, and will require expert boatbuilders.

Construction: Batten-seam planking over sawn frames.

Lofting is required.

Plans include 4 sheets.

16' 0" Prospector

Designer: 
Ted Moores
Skill Level to Build: 
novice

The 16' Prospector features a flattened, shallow arch hull with its fullness carried into the bow and stern, good depth amidships to maintain freeboard and deepened ends to keep paddlers and gear dry.

25' Dark Harbor 17 1/2

Designer: 
B.B. Crowninshield
Skill Level to Build: 
Advanced

25′ LOA carvel-planked daysailer with small cabin. Construction: Carvel planked over steamed frames. Alternative construction: Cold-molded or strip. Lofting is required. Plans include 4 sheets.

17’ Kayak, Endeavor

Designer: 
Steve Killing
Skill Level to Build: 
Intermediate

Steve Killing’s design is fast becoming well-known, in part due to the Endeavour being build in many a WoodenBoat School class, as well as being the featured boat in the Ted Moores book Kayakcraft.

This is the boat for you, even if you...

Jimmy Skiff

Designer: 
Chesapeake Light Craft
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner/Intermediate

Before the advent of the outboard motor, rowing/sailing skiffs were common on Chesapeake Bay. They were used for crabbing, fishing, transporting goods, and enjoying summer evenings with a friend.