Boat Plans & Kits

If you are a designer who offers plans, or kit boats, we invite you to enter your information in the Directory of Boat Plans & Kits. There is no charge! This is for boats of ANY hull material. And if you’re in the market for a boat to build, this is a fine place to start.

 

831 results for All Boat Plans & Kits

Milford 20

Designer: 
Neville Watkinson & Mark Fitzgerald
Skill Level to Build: 
Intermediate

The Milford 20 is a trailer-able shoal draft sharpie schooner modelled on the New Haven sharpies of the late 19th. century. It was inspired by Mark Fitzgerald’s FLORIDAYS design, as published in Reuel Parker’s Sharpie Book and featured in...

15' 9" Huron Cruiser

Designer: 
Bear Mountain Boats
Skill Level to Build: 
novice

The lines for this canoe were taken from an original 'Huron' built in cedar/canvas by the Peterborough Canoe Company. It was a second grade model in a series of Cruiser canoes that measured from 16'x33" to 18'x37". "They have good carrying...

Kahuna Nui

Designer: 
Mark Smaalders
Skill Level to Build: 
Advanced

Kahuna Nui is intended for extended offshore cruising and living aboard. She is available as a sailing auxiliary or as a motorsailer with an enclosed pilothouse. She has a canoe hull for ease of construction, with a full keel for strength and...

Selkie Kayak Kit

Designer: 
John Lockwood
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner

The Selkie takes two of our most popular boats (The Arctic Tern 14 and the Murrelet) and marries them into one elegant, light weight boat that petite women, or those looking for a tight fitting play boat, will love. John Lockwood nailed his...

JAM 8

Designer: 
Edward Sutt
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner

The JAM 8 is a true personal watercraft. While only 7 foot 4 inches long, it can carry up to 200 pounds. The JAM 8 is perfect for exploring flat water rivers, ponds and marshes.

Daysailer 30'

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani and Matteo Costa
Skill Level to Build: 
expert

If we have to base ourselves on market demand before 2008, the two daysailers that we propose are very small. At that time, generally characterized by a continuous increase in boat size, it seemed as though a daysailer could not be less than 12 m...