Boat Plans & Kits

If you are a designer who offers plans, or kit boats, we invite you to enter your information in the Directory of Boat Plans & Kits. There is no charge! This is for boats of ANY hull material. And if you’re in the market for a boat to build, this is a fine place to start.

 

831 results for All Boat Plans & Kits

Chesapeake 17

Designer: 
Chesapeake Light Craft
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner/Intermediate

The Chesapeake 17 is one of our most popular kits. Its handling qualities and speed combined with a large cockpit and voluminous stowage make it one of the most capable touring boats around.

Zip

Designer: 
Glen L Marine
Skill Level to Build: 
beginner

A 14' Classic Style Runabout

MOTH

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani
Skill Level to Build: 
intermediate

MOTH, designed according to the rules of the Classic Moth Class, is a fast and enjoyable boat. It has a narrow hull, designed so as to minimize wet surface, is relatively stable and planes easily.

ALBATROS 26’

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani
Skill Level to Build: 
advanced

ALBATROS 26’ is the smallest sister of the ALBATROS family, our modern classic yachts. Far its size it cannot be defined a “blue water yacht” but it is a seaworthy boat.

Merry Wherry Two

Designer: 
Ron Mueller
Skill Level to Build: 
Beginner

Designed For Capacity The Merry Two is the versatile Merry - row with a partner, take a friend as a passenger, or row by yourself - perfect for the larger rower. Or tour as Matt Kirchoff did with his son, on a one month trip exploring the outer...

VG-Open30

Designer: 
Geoff Van Gorkom
Skill Level to Build: 
Intermediate to expert

The 30 footer has always been a popular and practical racer, particularly with amateur boat builders. To capitalize on this and bring more affordable boats into the market, Van Gorkom Yacht Design have entered the Open30 arena with an exciting...

Daysailer 30'

Designer: 
Paolo Lodigiani and Matteo Costa
Skill Level to Build: 
expert

If we have to base ourselves on market demand before 2008, the two daysailers that we propose are very small. At that time, generally characterized by a continuous increase in boat size, it seemed as though a daysailer could not be less than 12 m...