Extended Content

The videos, photographs, and articles posted here relate to specific issues of WoodenBoat.

 

  • WB No. 254, Jan/Feb 2017: SKIMMER is a light and fast houseboat, merges the idea of a livable Dutch motor barge with a fast and light Hickman Sea Sled. Motor barges are generally flat-water boats that maximize living space, and they can be found throughout Europe’s canal system. The Sea Sled, progenitor of the ubiquitous Boston Whaler, is fast and seaworthy. SKIMMER Particulars LOA: 37...
  • WB No. 253, Nov/Dec 2016: FLAIR is an update of the early 20th-century auto-boat type. Auto-boats took their styling cues from the fledgling car industry; they were the precursors to the later runabout. Particulars LOA: 29′ (8.84m) LWL: 27′9″ (8.47m) Beam: 6′9″ (2.06m) Beam WL: 5′9″ (1.76m) Draft: 22″ (0.56m) Displacement (half-load): 2,840 lbs (1...
  • WB No. 252, Sept/Oct 2016: The racing strategy for Class 40 boats involves running downwind, and PROTON’s freestanding cat-ketch rig, using carbon-fiber masts and wishbone booms, is designed to make the most of it, including stable wing-on-wing sailing. Steering is via dual rudders operated by a single tiller working through an Ackermann arm linkage. When heeled, PROTON’s center of flotation...
  • In WoodenBoat No. 252, Sept/Oct 2016, Editor Matt Murphy explores the work of Leslie Jones (1886–1967), a staff photographer for The Boston Herald Traveler from 1917 to 1956. Jones had a particular interest in yachting, and covered racing at Marblehead, 20 or so miles northeast of Boston, throughout his career. His 40,000 photographs, covering subjects ranging from sports to celebrities to crime to everyday life, are cared for by the Boston Public Library. Here we present links to the stunning images in our article so readers may explore them in greater detail than that allowed by the printed page.
  • WoodenBoat magazine No. 251 (July/August 2016): The 16′ scow “13” is meant to provide the same sporty experience as the ubiquitous Sunfish design, but to carry two or even three adults while doing so. The mandate was for a simple rig — a definition stretched by the designer as he explored this boat’s potential. The extra-wide beam allows easy movement around the boat...
  • WoodenBoat magazine No. 251 (July/August 2016) includes an article on PT-658, a 78′ Higgins motor torpedo boat built for the U.S. Navy during World War II. A group of PT Boat veterans banded together to restore her between 1995 and 2005, and the boat is now fully functional and afloat as a museum ship in Portland Oregon. Powered by three working 1,850-hp Packard V-12 gasoline engines, PT-658 is today the only fully operational World War II-era PT Boat. The following is a list of resources for those who wish to explore PT boats in more depth.
  • WB No. 250, May/Jun 2016: MANTA is a simple and versatile boat—quick to build, and quick to get underway. The designer considered three different hull shapes when developing the concept for a home-buildable sit-on-top fishing kayak. He chose No. 2—a V-bottomed hull (the green one) —for its relative ease of construction and good performance. MANTA’s simple shape is built by first forming the sides...
  • WB No. 249: SERENA is meant to keep the good aspects of the 30′2″ Shields-class one design, but in a boat that’s 25′ long. The new boat’s rig makes good use of the “flipping topsail” arrangement developed by Maine schoonerman Havilah Hawkins. Although inspired by a larger, longer-ended sloop, SERENA has relatively short overhangs in order to maximize her...
  • In WoodenBoat Nos. 249 and 250, author Patrick Beautement describes in detail how the A.K. Ilen School of Wooden Boat Building in Limerick, Ireland, built four boats known as “gandelows.” The gandelow is a general-purpose type of rowing craft once common in the River Shannon Estuary. These boats are hard-chined, with a rounded bottom to make them easier to work free from the mud after...
  • WB No. 248: The 22′ power catamaran SEAHORSE is meant to carry six people—and their kayaks—on excursions to distant paddling grounds. She’s also adaptable to other uses, such as a support boat for waterfront parks or a power launch for rowing clubs. In flat water and lightly loaded, SEAHORSE will reach her cruising speed of 5 knots with just 10 hp. But because the boat...