The Whiskey Plank

The whiskey plank, traditionally, is the last plank fastened into the hull. The occasion is typically marked by a party to celebrate.

The views expressed are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those of WoodenBoat.

 

  • by Reuel Parker

    Sharpie Cat 42 Sail Plan. As a cruising sailor, I have noted for many years the increasing numbers of cruising catamarans. Despite the fact that all my cruising has been in monohulls, multihulls have always been of interest to me. I sailed on a Piver trimaran in the Bahamas with a friend many years ago, and sailed on a couple of the big charter “cattlemarans” in Key West. I have numerous friends...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Sea Bright 39 Sail Plan. As many of you know, I am a devoted fan of the Sea Bright Skiff. These remarkable surf boats developed on the New Jersey shore in the early 19th century, and spread around America in the life/rescue service, once they became respected as the most seaworthy of all small craft. I wrote about them in WoodenBoat Magazine (issue #230, Jan/Feb 2013), featuring a 14′ camp skiff...
  • by Reuel Parker

    The author’s Yawl 43 Sail Plan. During my research on sharpies, many years ago, I was intrigued by the boats of a Long Island designer/builder named Thomas Clapham. In the late 1870s, Clapham developed a “new” hull shape he called the “nonpareil sharpie.” While traditional sharpies are flat-bottomed, a handful of innovative designers were experimenting with different...
  • By Reuel Parker

    IBIS sailing in the Florida Keys with her new owner. About a decade ago, a disturbing real estate trend gained increasing prevalence on the east coast of the United States: Boatyards and marinas began to disappear, being replaced by condominiums with slips. To have a boat slip, you had to purchase a condominium. Of course, most boat owners don’t want, don’t need, and cannot afford a condominium (...
  • By Reuel Parker

    T’IEN HOU sailing to Cat Island, Bahamas, in 2005. In 1999, when it looked like I might actually survive stage #4 cancer, I did two things: I bought a house in Maine, and I started construction on my fifth cruising sailboat. The house was a mistake (perhaps houses are always a mistake—at least for me). Doing these two things simultaneously was downright stupid. I spread myself too thin, both...
  • By Reuel Parker

    LEOPARD making 12 knots on the Bahama Banks. In the early 1990s I leased a large steel industrial building just north of Ft. Pierce, Florida. I had recently split up with my third “wife” in Key West, and moved back to the Ft. Pierce area to set up a new shop where I could work more efficiently with Bill Smith, my boat building partner (he was tired of commuting to the Keys). In 1991 I received a...
  • by Reuel Parker

    The 1928 Alden Malabar Junior sailing on Long Island Sound in 1985. In mid-July of 1981, I sailed into New York Harbor in FISHERS HORNPIPE, my first cruising sailboat ( see Blog #31 ). I had an interview with David Beggs, in charge of restoration work on the ships in the South Street Seaport Museum, and landed a summer job as a restoration shipwright. I worked mostly on AMBROSE, the museum’s...
  • by Reuel Parker

    TERESA de ISLA MORADA flying her kite on Chesapeake Bay, 1985. In early 1985 I leased an “abandoned” property on the south side of Windley Key, in Islamorada, Florida. It had three acres, a ruined fishing camp, and a 100-foot private canal and concrete dock. It had vacant lots on both sides, and it was very overgrown with indigenous shrubs and trees, coconut palms and casuarina (Australian) pines...
  • by Reuel Parker

    FISHERS HORNPIPE in Riviera Beach, Florida, after 35,000 miles of sailing on three oceans. In early 1973 I decided I wanted a big sailboat—and that I wanted to sail off into the sunset, as the old cliché says. I lived on the California coast at that time, and I commenced looking around for a used boat. I soon realized I couldn’t afford anything I wanted. My cruising sailboat criteria were based...
  • by Reuel Parker

    T’IEN HOU in her junk-rigged Lorcha persona, circumnavigating Great Exuma. In very shallow parts of the Bahamas, places protected behind large islands and in “bights” (tidal estuaries and the lee-side west coasts of some islands), there are strange underwater formations I call “haystacks.” These are formed in soft “marl”—the white mud made from sand...