11' Oregon Peapod

This design came about when I got to thinking about having an elegant dinghy for our 34′ Topsail Ketch Sunrise. Since she was a double ender (with a pinky stern) I thought it would be fun to have a dinghy that was also double ended.

I showed the idea to the clients for whom we were designing the 8′ Portland Yawlboat and another 11-footer. They liked it and decided to go ahead with it instead of the other 11-footer we’d started.

The classic Down East Peapod, named in honor of her shape, was most commonly used in lobstering alongshore, where a larger boat could not safely work. The Oregon Peapod has a fuller stern than the more symmetrical Down East style Peapod, to give better bearing aft for clamping on an outboard engine.

She is big enough to serve well as a trailered boat, sailed off the beach, or as a car-topper. She can carry a normal family and their picnicking gear for a day of fun and exploring. Or, she can be carried aboard a larger boat as a dinghy or shore boat.

Our arrangement with the builders was that they were to pay us a nominal design fee, and we were to get dinghies 1, 51, 101, and so forth as our design royalties. I'd be awash in dinghies now if they'd gone ahead with their building program....

However, what I’ve learned to be an axiom in the marine business is that when the builder doesn't want to spend the money to pay a proper design fee, either through poverty or parsimony, there is very little likelihood of the project ever seeing completion. With little invested with the designer, there is little lost in walking away from the project. If there is a substantial investment made in the design, which is the foundation of the enterprise, then there is more of a commitment to go ahead with the venture.

Others have gone ahead and built from this design. We have plans for fiberglass and wood construction, and these are shown on the pages of our Small Craft Plans book. You can order it online at http://tillerbooks.com/Small_Craft_Plans.php

The design calls for two mast steps, allowing her to be sailed as a sloop as shown on the sail plan, or as a catboat. The catboat rig involves moving the mast to the forward position and not using the jib. This could work well as a reefed rig in gustier conditions, or for training work.

Design Specs

Designer: 
Jay Benford
Year of Design: 
1977
LOA: 
11'-0"
Beam: 
4'-6"
Draft: 
0'-6"
Displacement: 
105 pounds structural weight, 455 when loaded to designed waterline
Materials: 
Wood
Fiberglass
Propulsion: 
Sails or oars
Skill Level to Build: 
Moderate
Available as: 
Complete Plans
Cost: 
$60.00
Contact Information: 

Phone: 410-745-3235

Mail: 29663 Tallulah Lane, Easton, MD 21601

Email: info@tillerbooks.com