to WoodenBoat.com or

Skerry


Category: Daysailers
Skerry

 The Skerry design combines elements of traditional working craft of the British Isles and Scandinavia, with a little bit of American Swampscott Dory thrown in. The blend of historical antecedents yields excellent performance under sail or oar, along with good looks and ease of construction in plywood. This John C. Harris design fuses excellent rowing and sailing qualities into one attractive craft. Sail when there’s wind, row when there’s not. You’ll cover the miles either way.

The flaring sides make the Skerry stable and dry under sail. The stock sprit rig was chosen because it’s easy to set up and handle, powerful for its size, and stows inside the hull for transport. Under oars, the Skerry has a long, easy glide and excellent tracking. Two rowing positions permit the Skerry to be rowed with one, two, or three adults on board.

Ultralight weight—about a hundred pounds—also means the Skerry is easy to handle ashore. 



DESIGN SPECS
Designer:
John C. Harris
Year of Design:
2001
LOA:
15'
Beam Length:
54"
Draft Length:
5" Rowwing / 30" Sailing
Displacement:
Hull Weight - 95 lbs.
Materials:
Wood
Fiberglass
Other
Propulsion:
Sail, Oars or Motor
Skill Level to Build:
Intermediate
Cost:
$1250 Rowing Kit + $975 Sailing Kit / Plans: $89
Website:
Contact Information:

1805 George Avenue Annapolis Maryland 21401 Phone: 410-267-0137

<< VIEW ALL BOAT PLANS & KITS

Comments

Submitted by Kevin Brown on

If you go to Youtube and type in Diawl Bach sailing, you should find some views of my own homebuilt skerry. The name is Welsh for Wee Devil, an apt name , I think. I sail on the west Wales coast on the Milford Haven waterway and I will try to keep video updated as and when possible. As a home built boat I ran into no real problems. If you have reasonable DIY skills and can tell one end of a tool from the other you should have no problems either. Good luck if you build one, You will not be disappointed I promise you that.