The Whiskey Plank

The whiskey plank, traditionally, is the last plank fastened into the hull. The occasion is typically marked by a party to celebrate.

The views expressed are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those of WoodenBoat.

 

  • by Reuel Parker

    Approaching “The Keyhole”—west entrance to North Bight, Andros, Bahamas (IBIS, 2010). I sold my pilot schooner LEOPARD in late 1998, during my fight with cancer, and several years went by before I built my next cruising sailboat, T’IEN HOU. I launched her in early 2002, and in ‘03, ‘04 and ‘05, ran through the Bights of Andros with her. In early 2003 we...
  • by Reuel Parker

    In the South Bight of Andros—LEOPARD’S Crewmembers Amy, Scotty & Kris. In my eternal search for alternative ways of doing things, I have sought for many years to find an expeditious route from South Florida to the central and eastern Bahamas. The obvious route is to sail from Key Biscayne to Bimini, clearing into the Bahamas there. From Bimini, most yachts with a draft of eight...
  • By Reuel Parker

    After running the northern New Jersey coast between Manasquan Inlet and Sandy Hook in the restored 1965 Chris Craft Commander 27 JB , we entered New York Harbor on May 3rd at 11:30. The 5-foot swell that was running turned into the Harbor, and JB literally surfed down the ground swells, blowing out big wings of spray as her bows plowed into the wave troughs. I had never experienced anything like...
  • by Reuel Parker

    The restored 1965 Chris Craft Commander 27 J.B. just prior to being launched for the first time in a decade. I spent the last two winters restoring a 1965 Chris Craft Commander 27 for Tony Bianco, an old and dear friend from New York. 1965 was only the second year for the “styled in fiberglass” Commanders. I usually have nothing to do with fiberglass boats, but Tony is getting old and...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Sharpie Cat 42 Sail Plan. As a cruising sailor, I have noted for many years the increasing numbers of cruising catamarans. Despite the fact that all my cruising has been in monohulls, multihulls have always been of interest to me. I sailed on a Piver trimaran in the Bahamas with a friend many years ago, and sailed on a couple of the big charter “cattlemarans” in Key West. I have numerous friends...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Sea Bright 39 Sail Plan. As many of you know, I am a devoted fan of the Sea Bright Skiff. These remarkable surf boats developed on the New Jersey shore in the early 19th century, and spread around America in the life/rescue service, once they became respected as the most seaworthy of all small craft. I wrote about them in WoodenBoat Magazine (issue #230, Jan/Feb 2013), featuring a 14′ camp skiff...
  • by Reuel Parker

    The author’s Yawl 43 Sail Plan. During my research on sharpies, many years ago, I was intrigued by the boats of a Long Island designer/builder named Thomas Clapham. In the late 1870s, Clapham developed a “new” hull shape he called the “nonpareil sharpie.” While traditional sharpies are flat-bottomed, a handful of innovative designers were experimenting with different...
  • By Reuel Parker

    IBIS sailing in the Florida Keys with her new owner. About a decade ago, a disturbing real estate trend gained increasing prevalence on the east coast of the United States: Boatyards and marinas began to disappear, being replaced by condominiums with slips. To have a boat slip, you had to purchase a condominium. Of course, most boat owners don’t want, don’t need, and cannot afford a condominium (...
  • By Reuel Parker

    T’IEN HOU sailing to Cat Island, Bahamas, in 2005. In 1999, when it looked like I might actually survive stage #4 cancer, I did two things: I bought a house in Maine, and I started construction on my fifth cruising sailboat. The house was a mistake (perhaps houses are always a mistake—at least for me). Doing these two things simultaneously was downright stupid. I spread myself too thin, both...
  • By Reuel Parker

    LEOPARD making 12 knots on the Bahama Banks. In the early 1990s I leased a large steel industrial building just north of Ft. Pierce, Florida. I had recently split up with my third “wife” in Key West, and moved back to the Ft. Pierce area to set up a new shop where I could work more efficiently with Bill Smith, my boat building partner (he was tired of commuting to the Keys). In 1991 I received a...