The Whiskey Plank

The whiskey plank, traditionally, is the last plank fastened into the hull. The occasion is typically marked by a party to celebrate.

The views expressed are those of the authors and may not necessarily reflect those of WoodenBoat.

 

  • by Bruce Halabisky

    WoodenBoat contributor Bruce Halabisky and his young family have been cruising in a 34′ wooden boat for the past seven years. Most recently the family crossed the Atlantic from Maine, via the Azores, and then sailed on to Senegal. Since March this year, they’ve been in the Caribbean. In this special blog post, Bruce discusses the joys and challenges of extended cruising with young children aboard...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Mast Section from step to spreaders, 9 1/2″ x 7 1/2″ outside dimensions. I have developed a “new” mast construction method for use on light- to moderate-displacement sailboats having a Marconi rig, and for motorsailers. I put “new” in quotes because I am sure it has been thought of before now. The four corners of the new construction sequence are all made identical in section, from Douglas fir or...
  • by Reuel Parker

    In early 1985 I searched South Florida for a place to set up a small informal boatyard—really just a place to build my newly-designed Exuma 44 cat schooner in cold-molded wood. Camping out with a group of friends in the Keys, I found an overgrown, deserted property on the south shore of Windley Key (Islamorada) that seemed perfect. It had about three acres, a ruined fish-camp shack, a 100′ canal...
  • by Reuel Parker

    For over 35 years I have lived, on and off, as a cruising sailor. In addition to designing, building and restoring wooden boats, this has been my life. In all those years, I have learned a lot, and made a lot of observations. Cruisers are in some ways a huge community, spanning oceans and borders, as well as lifestyles and economies. So there is overlap, a great exchange of information, and...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Around 1991, Jon Eaton (my editor at International Marine Publishing) suggested that I write a book about sharpies. He knew I was a fan of the type (inshore fishing/oystering/crabbing boats), and I gladly accepted the assignment. I researched the history of sharpies in various museums and historical societies on the US East Coast, from Mystic Seaport to Miami. I already owned many books,...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Sail Plan for the Australia 47, featuring L-Head rotating wing masts In 2003 I received a commission to design a 47′ aluminum schooner for a doctor in Australia, who wanted a fast, shoal-draft racer/cruiser. I designed new rotating wing L-Head masts for her, using modern hardware, winches and aircraft-grade plywood for the mast sides. The new masts, while based on my earlier low-tech L-Head masts...
  • by Reuel Parker

    In the late 1990s it occurred to me to design a trailerable one-design racer. I was living in Key West, and I also saw this as a way to get involved in Key West Race Week, a fairly major event in the world of fast sailboats. Conch 32 Sail Plan. Most small one-design racers have fin keels and require custom trailers, necessitating the use of a crane or Travel Lift to launch and haul them. Without...
  • by Reuel Parker

    T’IEN HOU in her early “Lorcha” persona, anchored off New Bight, Cat Island. I first sailed to the Bahamas in early 1981, in my cutter FISHERS HORNPIPE. I had sailed the HORNPIPE from California, through the Panama Canal, arriving in Key West in late 1980. Since the Bahamas were pretty much on the way to anyplace north, I decided to make a quick perusal of them. I didn’t expect much, after the...
  • by Reuel Parker

    In cruising, sometimes something good comes out of something bad. On Friday the 13th of April 2012, I was sailing homeward bound in my sharpie schooner IBIS. I had three close friends on board, and we were enjoying the unparalleled beauty of the Exuma Cays Land and Sea Park. We had been anchored for the night off the crescent beach at the southwest end of Hawksbill Cay, a place I have visited...
  • by Reuel Parker

    Delfine (Angel #1) as figurehead for VALKYRIE, our Folkboat restoration, in 2000. No, they are not a myth—Reuel’s Angels really do exist! For reasons which verge on magical good luck, the Outer Banks of North Carolina have always provided me with great crewmembers. For the last thirty-two years, I have visited Ocracoke Island, a beautiful, remote place of long sandy beaches, high dunes, brackish...